Wednesday, 12 June 2019

Bath nats trip report, Sunday 9th June: Bathampton Meadows, nr Bath

Leader: STEVE CURTIS

Click links for more photos


Thanks to all who turned out on an overcast but warm day,credit must be given to Peter Fear and his team for keeping the riverside path as wildlife friendly as possible.We took a steady walk along the river path and then on to the private nature reserve with plenty to see and discuss throughout.
 I would also like to thank all who kept records during the walk, below are a list of findings, with plenty of photos on https://www.facebook.com/groups/127504944553098/ .



BIRDS  Bathampton Meadows
Canada goose, swift, jackdaw, wood pigeon, whitethroat, sand martin, buzzard, blackbird, reed bunting, robin, magpie, moorhen, chiffchaff, bullfinch, kingfisher, blue tit, blackcap, carrion crow, mallard,swift.

Bathampton Meadows 2019-06-09 notable species
Riverside path
Small Teasel
10-spot, 7-spot and 2-spot Ladybirds on nettles, as well as Harlequin Ladybird, which was almost everywhere.
Large patches of Cleavers galled by the mite, Cecidophyes rouhollahi, causing twisted, swollen and folded leaves.

Ox-bow NR
Early Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza incarnata) [sighting], Southern Marsh Orchid (D.praetermissa), Common Spotted Orchid (D.fuchsii) and the hybrid between the last two (D. x grandis).
Meadow Rue (Thalictrum flavum) frequent and increasing. Otherwise rare and very scattered along the river elsewhere.
Celery-leaved Buttercup (Ranunculus sceleratus) [sighting] on mud on the edge of a ditch.
Pink Water-speedwell (Veronica catenata) and Blue Water-speedwell (Veronica anagallis-aquatica) in muddy areas and the edge of the ox-bow [sightings]
Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia), abundant along the path by the river.
Rust (Puccinia phragmitis) on Clustered Dock (Rumex conglomeratus) [sighting]. Its other host, Common Reed, grows in the ox-bow.
Leaves of Alder (Alnus glutinosa) galled by two species of mite, Eriophyes inangulis (in angles of veins) and E.laevis (red 'knobs' between veins) [sighting]
Old trees of Grey Alder (Alnus incana) by river.
Sawflies: Tenthredo mesomelas and Athalia rosae
Tapered Drone-fly, Eristalis pertinax
Honey Bee, Apis mellifera
Rabbit
Fox

Butterflies:   Common Blue  10                  Brown Argus 2            
Small Tortoiseshell  1               Speckled Wood 1             
Green-veined White  1 

Macro Moths:  Yellow Shell  1                   Heart & Dart   
1            Flame Shoulder   1                   Common Wave  
1              Silver Ground Carpet  2 

Micro Moths: Straw Dot (Rivula sericealis),   Mint Moth  3                      Thistle Ermine 
1          Stigmella glutinosa (Leaf mine on Alder) , Tortrix moth (Agapeta hamana)

Dragonfly:     Emperor   1 

Damselfly:     Azure  3                                 Common Blue 
7            White Legged  4                      Large Red    
1                        Blue-tailed   6 

                      Banded Demoiselle 10,         Beautufl Demoiselle  
3,  Red-eyed   1. 
Parasitic wasp with aphid carcass on the Oak leaf was Discritulus planiceps .
Fungi
Spring Fieldcap ( Agrocybe praecox) and Wrinkled Fieldcap ( Agrocybe rivulosa) mushrooms, respectively in grass and on a wood chip pile. The latter species was first described in 2003 and first recorded in the UK in 2004, since when it has become widespread.

1 comment:

  1. Sounds like a great time with plenty of good stuff seen.

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